Hilbert College Zombie Run

The Hilbert College Student Veterans Association and Leadership Program will be hosting their 1st ever Zombie Run on Saturday, September 23. The event will run from 8:00AM to 4:30PM, and is located on the soccer field behind Trinity Hall. 

An early bird special will run from now until August 7, or for the first 25 people for $15. Tickets after the special will be $30 and can be purchased on the day of the run. The money raised helps to send our Veterans to San Antonio, Texas for a national conference run by the National SVA. The money will also go to helping the Leadership Program build a patio for St. Joe’s.

For more information and to purchase your tickets head to  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/hilbert-college-5k-zombie-run-tickets-35825122907

 

2017 Commencement Live Streaming Video

Hilbert College is pleased to announce that the school’s 56th Annual Commencement on Saturday, May 13, 2017 will be streamed live on the internet.  This marks the fourth consecutive year that Hilbert’s commencement ceremony will be available for live online viewing.  The ceremony will be streamed using Boxcast technology.

Commencement begins at 1:00 p.m. at the Wesleyan Church of Hamburg.  We are happy to be able to provide this free streaming and encourage you to share the link with friends and family who may not be in attendance at the church.

Click here for live stream >>>  

(live stream will begin at 12:50 pm)

Healthy Habits: Establish these habits for a successful life

From the Hilbert College Wellness Center
by Kirsten Falcone, RN

Healthy Habits:
Establish these habits for a successful life

Daily, we are bombarded with information regarding obtaining a healthy lifestyle: Eat “this” to lose weight, take “this” to feel better, visit “this” place to get away. None of us wants to be unsuccessful. But success in life doesn’t just happen all at once or with only one step. It involves a lot of little steps that turn into habits. Wise choices in each moment lead to great habits. Good health is more than just physical; it is mental, emotional and spiritual, as well. There are hundreds of tips available. (I have listed some good Website resources in this article.) But, as a nurse, mother and small group leader, here are a “few” of my favorite habits.

Sleep. Nobody can function on too little sleep for very long. Sleep is one of the most important ways to take care of yourself. Everyone should get at least 7 to 9 hours of sleep per night (depending upon your individual needs). This is when your body repairs itself, when your immune system is strengthened, and your mind is restored. Here is a link to my article on sleep: https://hilbertcommunity.wordpress.com/2017/03/24/from-the-hilbert-college-wellness-center-the-importance-of-sleep/.

Exercise. Aerobic, strength and stretching are the three types. But aerobic is probably the most important for your cardiovascular health and circulation to all your bodily systems. Try and get at least 20 to 30 minutes of rigorous aerobic activity at least three times per week. Regular exercise can actually improve your immune system, lift your mood, keep all your systems in order, decrease the incidence of disease, and increase your life expectancy. People who are physically fit have the potential to do better in many areas, than their out-of-shape counterparts. They don’t need as many prescription or over the counter drugs, and they have far fewer doctor visits.

Nutrition. This includes eating the right things, and also controlling portion size. Good nutrition involves eating fruit and vegetables first, then meat, bread and cereal, dairy, and only a little fat. We all know what junk food is. Try and avoid it, and, while pizza and wings are convenient and popular, try not to eat them regularly. If you want to know more about nutrition, take a course, or read a nutrition textbook. The one I use is called Nutrition for Life, and can be ordered at this link: https://www.amazon.com/Nutrition-Life-2nd-Janice-Thompson/dp/0321570847/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1493227995&sr=8-3&keywords=nutrition+for+life

Hydration. Since water is responsible for so many functions in our body, and our bodies are at least 60 to 70 percent water, it is crucial to keep hydrated. Try to drink at least 64 to 96 ounces (or more) per day or the equivalent of four to six 16-ounce bottles of water, or eight to 12 8-ounce glasses of water. Another way to measure is to drink 50 to 100 percent of your weight number in ounces. For example, if you weigh 150 lbs., drink 75 to 150 ounces of water every day. Keeping a bottle of water with you throughout the day is a great habit to adopt! Refill it, as needed.

Drugs, alcohol and smoking. Here is something simple to remember: Just don’t smoke. It’s that simple. And definitely don’t do illicit drugs. Alcohol is okay, in moderation (if you are 21 or older). One to two glasses of red wine daily has been shown to be healthful. But be aware of your family history of alcoholism. If there is any doubt, find alternatives to drinking.

Changing addictive behaviors. If you are already addicted to alcohol, smoking or drugs, get help. Now. You won’t ever regret it. Of less importance, maybe, but still important, is to cut down on the amount of caffeine you ingest.  Workaholism is also running rampant in our society. Don’t use work as an escape, and don’t try to keep up with the Joneses.

Learning something new. A life spent learning something new on a regular basis is a life not wasted. Studies show that people live longer when they are constantly learning and trying new things. Step outside your comfort zone, and take a course on public speaking, self-defense, or even knitting! It might open up new doors and give you fresh insight.

Money management. Take a course on money management. Stay away from habitually relying on credit. Highly recommended is anything by Dave Ramsey. https://www.daveramsey.com/specials/welcome?ectid=30.31.9014

Hygiene. Take your shoes off, and wash your hands as soon as you arrive home. Floss your teeth every day, and brush your teeth and tongue after meals and before bed. Here is a link to my hygiene article: https://hilbertcommunity.wordpress.com/2017/03/21/from-the-hilbert-college-wellness-center-winning-health-battles-with-proper-hygiene/

Sexual health. Let me put it this way. Sex, it has been said, is a great blessing in marriage, but a great curse outside of it. This is countercultural thinking, but it is good advice. Remember the question your mom asked you: “If all your friends jumped off a bridge, would you jump, too?” That is what many are doing when they choose to have sex too soon. Besides the all-too-real threat of contracting an STI (sexually transmitted infection), there is the spiritual aspect, as well. A broken heart affects every aspect of your health, not just mental and emotional.

Socialization, Family and Friends. It’s likely that busy college students have enough social interaction most of the time. But there are those times when some real connection with people is missing and important. Some things to try: church communities, small interest groups (such as can be found at https://www.meetup.com/), book clubs, study groups, a class not related to your major, a community education class, and more. If you have family nearby, it is important to keep in contact with them. If your family is far away, make sure you call home regularly, so you will still feel as if you are a member. If you live with your family, it is important to note that study after study confirms that eating regularly together is one of the best things you can do. Also, it is important to identify if somebody in your life is more toxic than healthful. If so, it might be a good time to look for better company.

Faith, prayer and meditation. Prayer is considered communication with God, and meditation is closely related. Your spiritual health is just as, or more important than, your physical health. Practicing faith and regular connection with your Maker will bring peace, focus and meaning to your life.

Time management. Newsflash! Your time is your life. Spend your time wisely. Make sure you make space on your calendar for the important items first. That way it is more likely to happen! Don’t overschedule your life; know your limits, and know when to say no. Make certain you always show up for work, class and other obligations, and always on time. Finally, don’t forget to schedule time for yourself. You are important!

Moderation. Everything in moderation, including moderation. Purge perfectionism. If you make a mistake, admit it, and make a change for the better.

Practicing morality. We wouldn’t get very far without morals. Basically, they are the Ten Commandments, which can be summed up by stating, “Love God and love people.” Also included in this category are integrity (doing the right thing when nobody is looking), sexual morality and the following:

  • The “Golden Rule.” Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. This works. Even if you don’t think somebody deserves it, do it anyway. It’s the right thing to do.
  • Refraining from gossip. You wouldn’t want someone to gossip about you (Golden Rule, see above), so don’t do it to somebody else. If there is any question what gossip is, ask yourself, “If the person I am talking about were standing right here, would I still be saying these things?” If you wouldn’t, then you are probably gossiping.
  • When we are generous, we don’t put ourselves first. We are not the center of the universe. It is a credit to us when we are generous to somebody else.
  • We don’t know what others’ lives are like. It is easy to criticize, give an opinion or offer unsolicited advice. But be kind. Listen, and don’t judge. You are not in that person’s shoes.

Forgiveness. Forgiveness is easier to do when you know that it is more for you than for the other person. When you forgive somebody, it is like a weight has been released from your own shoulders. Sometimes forgiveness is a long journey, but taking that first step is worthwhile. Remember, you are not perfect either, so why should you expect the other person to be? Conversely, it is important to forgive yourself. If you have trouble in this area, it is a good idea to enlist the help of a counselor.

Music, art and hobbies. Having an outlet for stress, like playing a musical instrument, following an artistic path, or diving into a hobby, has been shown to increase longevity and decrease depression.

Gratitude. Yes, there are many things about which to complain. But finding gratitude instead of complaining will make positive people want to be around you. Nobody likes a critic, but everyone is partial to being thanked and appreciated. In the morning, when your alarm goes off, choosing to be thankful you have another day, instead of grouchy because you couldn’t sleep in, will propel you to a better day. Make note of all the positive things in your life, and concentrate on them. Choose to see the glass as half full, and it may transform to overflowing.

Smiling and laughing. Laughter is said to be the best medicine, and it is also contagious. Smiling at someone when he or she enters the room improves your relationship with that person. Becoming less critical is a skill worthy of acquiring. If you are short on joyfulness these days, buy a joke book, go to a comedy show, or ask your friends to tell you something funny. Finding the humor in most situations can turn a gray day sunny again.

 

 

For more information on healthy life habits, check out these sources:

MSN.com, Ten habits you’ll pay for in ten years:
http://www.msn.com/en-us/health/wellness/10-habits-youll-pay-for-in-10-years/ss-BBzOIgA?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=U218DHP#image=1

WebMD.com, Healthy Living: 8 steps to take today:
http://www.webmd.com/balance/features/healthy-living-8-steps-to-take-today#1

WebMD, How to keep healthy habits in mind:
http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/remember-healthy-habits#1

Mayo Clinic, The 12 habits of highly healthy people:
http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-blog/physical-activity-habits/bgp-20085745

Health.com, Healthy eating habits:
http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20934662,00.html

Feelhappiness.com, 107 healthy habits and behaviors for a healthier lifestyle:
http://feelhappiness.com/107-healthy-habits-for-a-healthier-lifestyle/

CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), List of unhealthy behaviors:
https://www.cdc.gov/500cities/definitions/unhealthy-behaviors.htm

PsychologyToday.com, Toxic relationships:
https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-time-cure/201308/toxic-relationships

 

The Sunshine Vitamin – From the Hilbert College Wellness Center

From the Hilbert College Wellness Center

by Kirsten Falcone, RN

The Sunshine Vitamin:
Benefits of Vitamin D

As the medical world makes discoveries, often what we think we’ve learned flies out the window. An example that quickly comes to mind is the discussion regarding the amount of coffee to drink, or how much red wine is a good thing. Should you get a suntan or stay in the shade? Is avoiding fat in your diet always a good thing? What about sodium? It seems the experts are always changing their minds. However, some recent findings have added to the knowledge about vitamin D, and you may find them thought-provoking.

What is vitamin D, and why do we need it? Your body needs vitamin D, a “fat-soluble” vitamin, to function properly. Fat-soluble vitamins need dietary fat in order to be absorbed into the body, and they are also stored in fatty tissues for future use. There are two kinds of vitamin D—vitamin D2 (found in food) and vitamin D3 (photosynthesized in the skin), but, for the sake of this article, we will refer to both simply as vitamin D.  Vitamin D is most well-known for helping your body absorb calcium and thereby keeping bones strong and healthy, but vitamin D also:

  • Recently was shown to lower the risk of respiratory infections.
  • Increases muscle strength.
  • Helps prevent certain types of cancer.
  • Plays a role in type 1 and 2 diabetes prevention.
  • May be helpful with some forms of arthritis.
  • Defends against aggressive breast cancer.
  • Lessens the symptoms of depression.
  • Helps protect against multiple sclerosis and its symptoms.
  • Protects against age-related bone loss.
  • May protect against cardiovascular disease.
  • Possibly contributes to successful weight loss in obese patients.

How is vitamin D acquired? Vitamin D can be acquired in three ways. One way is by exposing our skin to the ultraviolet rays of the sun. This sets off a chain reaction involving skin cholesterol, the liver and the kidneys, until converting into a compound the body can use. This compound assists the electrolyte calcium in strengthening bones. The second way the body acquires vitamin D is in food.  Supplements are the third way, and they should be used as a last resort (see below).

Here are some tips for acquiring vitamin D:

  • When outdoors, apply sunscreen after about 20 minutes (longer for darker skin), so enough of the ultraviolet rays can be absorbed. (Vitamin D deficiency is higher in black Americans, according to a 2012 CDC report, estimated at 31 percent.)
  • Expose yourself to the sun when it is highest in the sky, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. (Be careful to avoid sunburn, by putting on sunscreen after 20 minutes or more, depending on your skin pigmentation.)
  • Live closer to the equator. People in the northern half of the United States, and anywhere north of 40 degrees latitude are less likely to be exposed to enough ultraviolet light. (The 40 degree latitude line can be drawn horizontally across approximately the center of the United States.)
  • Eat foods, such as salmon, swordfish, mackerel, tuna, sardines, egg yolk, beef liver, mushrooms, and fortified foods, such as cereal, orange juice and milk.
  • The recommended daily allowance (RDA) for vitamin D is 600 International Units (IU) for people up to 70 years of age, and 800 IU for those older than 71.
  • Vitamin D is considered a fat-soluble vitamin, which simply means it can be stored in your body for when you need it. You cannot overdose on vitamin D synthesized from sunlight or from food, but it is possible to overdose on supplements. Symptoms of a vitamin D overdose are weakness, mental confusion, diarrhea, vomiting, loss of appetite, and calcium deposit formations in tissues such as the liver, kidneys and heart.
  • Be aware that tattoos that cover a large amount of skin are capable of blocking the production of vitamin D. Tattoos also make it uncomfortable to sit in the full sun because they heat up faster than the surrounding skin, causing itchiness. Therefore, having a tattoo is contraindicated for people who wish to sunbathe or acquire vitamin D in this manner.
  • Blood tests for vitamin D are available through your doctor.

Widely known diseases caused by vitamin D deficiency are rickets, osteomalacia, and osteoporosis. Rickets can be found in children whose bones form improperly, due to lack of vitamin D. With osteomalacia, bones are weak, cause pain, and are more susceptible to fractures. In cases of osteoporosis, the bones become more porous and break easily.

We have been told that we should always wear sunscreen, and that fat in our diets is bad. But, there are times when using sunscreen is not to your advantage, and eating some fat is good for you!

 

For more information, visit these Web sites:

WebMD, slideshow on vitamin D:
http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/ss/slideshow-vitamin-d-overview

WebMD, Breast cancer link:
http://www.webmd.com/breast-cancer/news/20110429/low-vitamin-d-linked-to-aggressive-breast-cancer#1

MedlinePlus:
https://medlineplus.gov/vitamind.html

MedlinePlus, Vitamin D lowers risk of respiratory infections:
https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163633.html

CDC (Center for Disease Control and Prevention) 2012 Levels of nutrients in U.S. population:
https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2012/p0402_vitamins_nutrients.html

CDC (Center for Disease Control and Prevention) vitamin D nutrition report:
https://www.cdc.gov/nutritionreport/pdf/Second%20Nutrition%20Report%20Vitamin%20D%20Factsheet.pdf

Mayo Clinic, vitamin D dosage information:
http://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/vitamin-d/dosing/hrb-20060400

 

Criminal Justice/Forensic Science Club Updates

The CJ/FS Club will host their annual Adopt-A-Highway program on Saturday, April 1.  The group will meet in the lower level of the Campus Center at 9:30 a.m.

The club will also host a Chicken BBQ on April 1, Noon-4 p.m. in the Swan Lobby.  Meal includes 1/2 chicken, spud potatoes, coleslaw, and a roll for $10.  Ticket are available at the door, or in advance from Mark Paoni or Hoby.

The club will also hold a Fish Fry and basket raffle on Friday, April 7 at 4-7 p.m. in the Campus Center Dining Hall.

FISH FRY DETAILS
April 7, 2017 | 4-7 PM
Hilbert College Campus Center
$10.50 Adult Meals
$6.50 Kid Meals

Coffee House Poet Night at Hilbert

Olivia Gatwood at Hilbert College
sponsored by SHARE and the Counseling Center

Wednesday, March 22, 2017
7:00 p.m.
St. Joseph’s Lounge    

Originally from Albuquerque, New Mexico, Olivia Gatwood has received national recognition for her poetry, writing workshops, and work as a Title IX Compliant educator in sexual assault prevention and recovery.  As a finalist at Brave New Voices, Women of the World and the National Poetry Slam, Olivia is an active member of the slam poetry community and has been featured on HBO, Verses & Flow, Button Poetry and Huffington Post, among others. Olivia has traveled nationally to perform and teach workshops on gender equality, sexuality, and social justice at over 70 colleges and 30 high schools nationwide.

Olivia will be performing some of her poetry on Wednesday, March 22nd at 7 p.m. in the St. Joseph’s Lounge as a part of “Relaxing in the Lounge” weekly activity sponsored by the Counseling Center. This event is sponsored by the S.H.A.R.E. Committee and the Counseling Center.

The Opening Act for Olivia Gatwood will be Hilbert College student Brynn Biesik, who will be reading three of her poems.

Hilbert Starz Win BIG with Sportsmanship

by Jill Cole-Splawski

starz-2

Row 1: Becca Giurdanella, Katie Eleczko, Kaitlin Graw, Taylor Achtyl, Taylor Smith, Emily Doan, Kelsi Sajdak. Row 2: Emily Weimer, Kaylee O’Donnell, Haley Sunday, Kimmie Cox and Paula Barton.

The Hilbert Starz Cheerleaders have engaged in a long season that ended in a victorious manner for the Starz. The season began with a competitive try out that ended with 13 athletes on the team. The team would practice regularly on Sunday and Wednesday nights from 8 PM- 11 PM. The team also cheered at almost every home basketball game for the Women’s or Men’s game.

The team then went to two competitions to show their Hilbert spirit. The first competition was the Chardon Cupid Cheer and Dance Challenge in Ohio where the team won first place on February 19th, 2017. The second competition was the Sanborn Falls Freeze Cheer and Dance Frenzy here in Western NY on February 26th, 2017 where they won second place after the RIT Tigers. The Hilbert Starz however won the Outstanding Sportsmanship Banner for the whole competition.

Hilbert Seniors Taylor Smith, Paula Barton and Kelsi Sajdak

Hilbert Seniors Taylor Smith, Paula Barton and Kelsi Sajdak

The 2016-2017 season is wrapping up, but throughout this season, the three “seniors” led the organization with developing authentic relationships with new students to ensure a strong future for the team. Taylor Smith and Kelsi Sajdak were the elected captains to the team who were asserted in finding a group of talented athletes from move in day to late September when try-outs occurred. The captains coordinated efforts for side lines, game prep and spirit along with assisting in organizing the competitions the team would attend. Team Mediator Paula Barton was also an influencer by helping with team morale and spirit. The seniors set a precedent on what it means to be a Hilbert Starz and the fans has reciprocated with an immense amount of support at games and competition.

Please take a moment to say thank you to the Hilbert Starz Cheerleaders who have worked hard all season to infuse Hilbert Spirit into our community. The team was comprised of; Taylor Smith, Kelsi Sajdak, Paula Barton, Becca Giurdanella, Katie Eleczko, Emily Doan, Kaylee O’Donnell, Haley Sunday, Taylor Achtyl, Emily Weimer, Kaitlin Graw and Kimmie Cox. The team was coached/advised by Jill Cole-Splawski (Director of Residence Life & Judicial Affairs) and Colleen Kumiega (Assistant Professor of Human Services).

 

 

Hilbert Students Help “Pack-A-Plane”

Hilbert College business club, ENACTUS, helped organized the collection of educational commodities to be delivered to those in need in and around the city of Bani in the Dominican Republic. The plane was packed and took off from the Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station on Friday, February 17.  Hilbert College students Lauren Carlin, Maggie Colern, and Calista Mis toured the Air Force Base and watched the plane take off for the Dominican Republic.

In total, more than 5,400 lbs. of goods, valued at over $13,000 will be delivered.  Some of the items include; composition notebooks, paper, pencils, crayons, colored pencils, athletic equipment, and more.