Hilbert’s Archives are Reorganized

Members of the Franciscan Sisters of St. Joseph (FSSJ) and the Hilbert administration celebrate Hilbert’s reorganized archives in the McGrath Library.  Hilbert enlisted the help of St. Bonaventure archivist, Dennis Frank, to help clean up and organize Hilbert’s archives, which date back to the 1950s.  A special lunch was held on June 12 in the library to observe and applaud the transformation.

Class Projects Raises Over $1150 for “Badge of Honor”

Group members (l to r): Madison Szczesniak, Autumn Miller, Baylee Brooks, and Lea Shanley. Not pictured: Brittany Profetta

A group in Dr. Mark Paoni’s Intro to Law and Justice class organized a service learning project through the Badge of Honor Association.  The group, consisting of members – Baylee Brooks, Autumn Miller, Brittany Profetta, Lea Shanley, and Madison Szczesniak,  raised awareness and money for the organization through selling their merchandise to local police agencies. The group had a goal of $500 and ended up raising more than $1,150. Way to go!

The Badge Of Honor Association is a Non-for-Profit Organization that exists to honor Men and Women in Law Enforcement who gave the ultimate sacrifice and those who go above and beyond the call of duty.

The Badge of Honor Association focuses on supporting the families of Police Officers in the event of a line of duty death, and those officers involved in critical or serious incidents while on duty. They cover all law enforcement across 25 counties of Western and Central New York.

 

Hilbert Students Attend BNSME Awards Gala

The Buffalo Niagara Sales & Marketing Executives Annual Awards Gala was held on Monday, March 5. A group of Hilbert students, along with professors Dan Roland and Amanda Recio, and Jeff Papia, Hilbert’s director of campus ministry and mission integration, attended the gala held at Salvatore’s Italian Gardens.

Hilbert students with Jeff Papia, and professors, Amanda Recio and Dan Roland, and Hilbert trustee Nancy Dobson.

Hilbert students with Jeff Papia, and his father, Russ Papia, and professors, Amanda Recio and Dan Roland.

 

 

Eating Healthfully in the Winter

Watch Your Weight!
Eating Healthfully in the Winter

by Kirsten Falcone, RN
Hilbert College Wellness Center

Have you found a little extra padding around your middle lately? You are not alone!

Many people find that wintertime eating is tricky when it comes to maintaining weight. This is due to many factors, including the types of food available, the need for “comfort food” in the dark winter months, and the availability of traditional wintertime favorites. The holidays, and their fattening menu have just passed, New Year’s resolutions are almost forgotten, and we are back to our old habits.

Here are a few tips that may help you reach the warmer days of spring, with your waistline intact:

Water. Instead of pop or sweetened drinks, substitute water. The dry winter air tends to dehydrate us, and what we mistake for hunger is often just thirst. Drinking a glass of water before you eat will hydrate you, help curb your appetite, and aid digestion. As an alternative, skim milk is mostly water, but also contains a good amount of calcium and vitamin D. (Vitamin D helps with seasonal depression, which many people encounter during the winter.)

Fruits and vegetables. A good rule of thumb is to make certain half your plate is fruits and vegetables. Try to pass up anything with fat or sugar added, such as fruit compote or au gratin potatoes. Fresh fruit and steamed vegetables are your best bet. Eat your vegetables and fruit before you eat your main course, so that you acquire the nutrients you need and do not overdo it with the more highly caloric entrée. (No, French fries and potato chips don’t count as vegetables!)

Lean meats. Given a choice between a hot dog, cheeseburger, or a chicken breast, choose the chicken breast more often. It is lower in fat, and fat does tend to end up around your middle during the months you are not exercising as much.

Whole grains. Choose whole wheat or whole grain products instead of white bread. The fiber in a true whole grain product is better for your heart and digestion. In addition, whole grain products have not been stripped of their nutrients. If you read the label on a whole grain product, it should list at least three grams per serving.

Unprocessed food. Try to avoid quick fix solutions, like cereal bars, protein bars, and other foods in prepackaged containers. Whole foods are better and have fewer additives. If you are going shopping at the grocery store, the unprocessed whole foods are usually the ones you will find if you walk around the perimeter of the store. They include dairy, eggs, meat, produce, and more.

Eat just half. It is okay to eat only half of the food on your plate, or just use a smaller plate. Do not let your conscience guilt you into retaining your membership in the Clean Plate Club. Your mom is not looking over your shoulder.

Sample the fattening choices. Yes, it is okay to do this. Just limit it to a spoonful or two, so you don’t feel as if you have deprived yourself.

Junk food. Do not even think about it! Keep away from the bags of chips, cookies, popcorn, and other temptations. This is a good time to “just say no.” If you need something to munch on, go for the carrots, almonds, apples, bananas, and other easily tote-able foods.

Dessert. Save dessert for one day per week. This will take some doing, especially when in certain environments. Alternatively, make fruit your dessert daily. It really just takes a different mindset, and fruit can be a delicious end of the meal.

 

For more information on eating healthfully in the winter, visit these Web sites:

WebMd:
http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/control-your-winter-appetite#1

http://www.webmd.com/diet/food-fitness-planner/default.htm

CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention):
https://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/healthy_eating/index.html

United States Department of Agriculture:
https://www.choosemyplate.gov/

 

 

Staying healthy on Spring Break

Don’t Take a Break from Good Health!
Staying healthy on Spring Break

By Kirsten Falcone, RN
Hilbert College Wellness Center

Spring Break is quickly approaching, and some college students choose to travel for much-needed warmer weather, sunshine, and relaxation. In order to benefit the most from a spring break away from home, there are some key health items to remember.

Protect yourself from the sun. The shortened daylight associated with the winter months has taken its toll on all of us by this time of year. But that is no reason to forget to protect yourself from sunburn. Use sunscreen of at least SPF 15 (preferably much higher) and reapply often, wear cover-ups and a hat, avoid the sun between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m., and wear sunglasses. If (but preferably before) you notice a sunburn, get out of the sun, and keep hydrated. Mild sunburns can be soothed with over-the-counter pain medications and cool compresses. Avoid any more sun exposure until the current burn has resolved.

Checklist for being in the sun:

  • Sunscreen >/= SPF 15, reapplied often
  • Cover-ups
  • Hat
  • Sunglasses
  • Highest risk between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.
  • Avoid sunburns by moving to the shade.
  • Keep hydrated.
  • OTC pain medications and cool compresses to soothe sunburn
  • Stay out of sun until burn has healed.

Be smart when drinking alcohol. The healthiest choice is one glass (five ounces) of red wine per day for women and two glasses per day for men. The liver cannot process more than one ounce of hard liquor, five ounces of wine, or 12 ounces of beer per hour. In addition, drink one eight-ounce glass of water per alcoholic drink, if at all possible, to prevent the effects of dehydration. Make sure one person is a designated driver, or arrange another mode of transportation. Also, be aware of people who might prey on unsuspecting tourists.

Checklist for drinking alcohol:

  • Drink only five ounces of red wine,
    one ounce of hard liquor,
    or 12 ounces of beer per day, to be healthy.
  • One drink per hour to avoid liver damage
  • One eight-ounce glass of water per hour to combat dehydration
  • Designated driver or another mode of transportation
  • Watch out for human predators!

Be aware of diseases and health risks. The CDC no longer lists Zika as a travel alert for Florida and Texas on its website. However, if you are traveling anywhere else on the globe that is on the CDC’s high-risk list, (http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/index.html), you will need to use mosquito repellent especially during the daylight hours in order to reduce the likelihood of Zika mosquitoes transmitting the virus to you.

Many travelers also come down with “Montezuma’s revenge” (food poisoning), but there are tips on avoiding that, too. The CDC has an app called “Can I Eat This?” For more information, go to this link: http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/apps-about. When you go to the link, you can also download other helpful travel apps.

Checklist for disease avoidance:

  • Visit the CDC website to familiarize yourself with the region you are visiting.
  • Download traveler apps specific to your needs.
  • Find out which vaccinations you may need well in advance of your international trip.

Wherever you plan to go, near or far, have a safe, relaxing and healthful Spring Break!

 

For more information on enjoying a healthful Spring Break, visit these Web sites:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):
Alcohol:
http://www.cdc.gov/family/springbreak/
Destination Information:
https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/destinations/list

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), handling food safely:
https://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/safe-food-handling/food-safety-tips-for-college-students/

Baylor University, Top 10 Ways to Not Become a Crime Victim (pdf):
https://business.baylor.edu/Steve_Gardner/Britain/NoCrime.pdf

 

How to Keep Active During the Winter Months

Don’t be a Couch Potato!
How to Keep Active During the Winter Months

by Kirsten Falcone, RN
Hilbert College Wellness Center

If you are like me, I keep active during the warmer months, but when the cold hits, it’s difficult to resist cocooning in my space and waiting it out until spring. But, did you know that lack of exercise is one of the biggest causes of mental health problems like depression and anxiety, and physical health problems, such as obesity, diabetes, heart disease, some types of cancer, and much more?

On the flip side, regular exercise can actually improve your immune system, lift your mood, keep all your bodily systems in order, decrease the incidence of disease, and increase your life expectancy. Physically fit people do not need as many prescription or over-the-counter drugs, and they have far fewer doctor visits. You are not in college to not do well, so it is a benefit to you to take care of yourself, because proper exercise can help you in every area of your life, including your grades!

There are three main categories of exercise. They are aerobic, strength training, and stretching. Aerobic exercise increases your heart rate. Some of the common ways you can achieve this are by walking briskly, jogging and swimming. (During the winter, though, it is difficult to safely go for a walk or jog, and it is challenging to find a swimming pool.) Strength training is usually done by lifting weights or performing “body-weight” exercises, such as push-ups. Stretching is important to increase flexibility and range of motion, as well as increase the blood circulation to your muscles and joints, thus reducing injury.

Here are some ideas to help you pull through the winter months:

  • Find an accountability partner. On days when you just have no ambition to burn some calories, an accountability partner can help you resist the urge to wait until tomorrow. Conversely, you can help your accountability partner in the same area. Pick someone who has the same goals as you do, such as losing 10 lbs. by Easter, or simply because it makes you feel healthier.
  • Visit the gym. On Hilbert Campus, that is located at the Hafner Recreation Center. http://www.hilberthawks.com/sports/2013/9/9/Facilities_0909135001.aspx?tab=weightroom.
  • Do calisthenics in your dorm room. Youtube has many exercise videos available, but you can start out with one like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHyGqsPOUHs.
  • Run up and down your dorm stairs for 20 minutes, 3 times per week.
  • Park on the far side of the parking lot, and walk the extra distance (provided your footwear has good treads to tackle icy conditions).
  • Take up a winter sport, such as cross-country or downhill skiing, snowshoeing or sledding.
  • When the conditions are good, you can still go for a brisk walk. 20-30 minutes, three times per week is a good start.
  • Extend the warm-weather sports you enjoy, but wear a couple extra layers of clothes.
  • If you can’t make it to the gym, invest in some dumbbells, and use them in your dorm room. Or you can use ordinary everyday objects, such as water bottles.
  • Jumping rope is a great aerobic activity. Here is a good beginner video you can try: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0NIvRAaOdlQ
  • Use an exercise ball. An exercise ball is large enough to be used in place of a desk chair, so sitting on it will improve posture. Plus, there are many great strength-training exercises you can learn. Many people swear by these for keeping their core strong.
  • Perform crunches, lunges, chair dips, push-ups and more in the privacy of your dorm room.
  • Take a yoga class. Yoga combines strength and stretching exercises, and many swear by it for its calming effects.
  • Use an exercise app. Most smart phones come with one of these. Find out how to use it, and it will help you set and meet your goals.
  • Finally, don’t overdo it. If you feel pain, just stop! Pain is a warning sign that you will injure yourself, and an injury is counterproductive to further fitness.

What does the nurse do for fitness? With smart phone in pocket (so I can track how far I went), I take my dog for a walk around the neighborhood for half an hour when the weather cooperates, and I use an elliptical for the days when I cannot face the elements. Every morning I stretch before I do anything else. Strength training will be the next adventure for me. I did not develop these habits overnight, but they have become part of my healthy “couch-potato-less” lifestyle. If I can do this (at my age!), then you certainly can, too!

For more information on keeping active during the winter months, click on these links:

Everyday Health, Exercises you can do anywhere anytime:
https://www.everydayhealth.com/fitness-pictures/exercises-you-can-do-anywhere-anytime.aspx?pos=1&xid=nl_EverydayHealthWomensHealth_20180129

WebMD, Lack of Exercise is More Deadly than Obesity:
http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/news/20150114/lack-of-exercise-more-deadly-than-obesity-study-suggests#1

CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), Benefits of Physical Activity:
https://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/basics/pa-health/index.htm

Money Crashers, Strength Training without Equipment:
http://www.moneycrashers.com/strength-training-exercises-women/

Mayo Clinic, How to Stretch:
http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/fitness/multimedia/stretching/sls-20076840

WebMD, Exercise Ball Moves:
http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/features/10-fun-moves-to-reshape-your-body-with-exercise-ball-workout#1