Hilbert’s Criminal Justice Ranked in Top 35 in the Nation

It’s an exciting time for the Hilbert Criminal Justice department! Our program was recently ranked #17 (out of 35) for the Top Criminal Justice Bachelor’s Degrees in the nation. The list was published by College Choice and features 35 colleges that offer full undergraduate degree programs in Criminal Justice.

According to College Choice,

To determine the best Criminal Justice programs we started first with the academic reputation of each school nationwide that offers the degree. We then examined retention rates, as it reflects student satisfaction. And we then took into account the affordability of the program and the early salaries of its graduates.

After our extensive research, we found those programs that are the country’s absolute best at training leaders in law enforcement and criminology. Our figures and information come from the university and colleges’ websites, PayScale, and nationally recognized U.S. News & World Report and The National Center for Education Statistics.

Take a look at the image below for more on Hilbert’s ranking, and head here to read the full article from collegechoice.net!

Save the Date for Brand Hack 2019

Hilbert is proud to be the location for Buffalo’s design “Hack-a-thon” on January 26, 2019, where professionals and students from the advertising and design community will work together in teams to help build a branded campaign from scratch in 5 hours for a local non-profit.

This event is a great way for students to gain real world experience in a fun and competitive setting, while networking with peers and professionals from Buffalo’s creative community.

Here’s how it works:

Professional team captains will work with teams of 3-5 students with an even disbursement of talent types (design, copywriting, marketing, etc.). Each team will be presented with a real-life non-profit organization in need of assets for a branded campaign. This will include a logo, tagline, and one marketing piece. Teams will have five hours to put together their branded campaign and will present their finished products to the judges, non-profit representatives, and other BrandHack participants.

You can register to get involved with this exciting event on the AAFBuffalo website here. Stay tuned on Facebook and Instagram for more information, and mark your calendars for more exciting Communication Career Week events happening at Hilbert from January 22-26, brought to you by the Hilbert College Digital Media and Communication Department in conjunction with the Hilbert Career Development & Community Engagement Center!

 

11 Ways to Stay Healthy During Winter Break

Keeping it “The Most Wonderful Time of the Year”
How to Stay Healthy on Winter Break!
From the Hilbert College Wellness Center
by Kirsten Falcone, RN

It’s mid-December, and you finally made it to winter break. Congratulations! While you’ve earned the right to celebrate after cramming for finals, there’s one more fact you should learn: Students are often more susceptible to illness during the holidays because of the considerable amount of stress they endure during the end-of-semester rush. Bummer, right? No one wants to be sick during the “most wonderful time of the year”. Luckily, there are some ways that can help you avoid feeling down and out during break.

Here are 11 tips to help you fight off holiday illness:

1.     Maintain proper hygiene by washing hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and covering your sneezes and coughs.

2.     Drink enough water. Try to drink at least 64 to 96 ounces (or more) per day or the equivalent of four to six 16-ounce bottles of water, or eight to 12 8-ounce glasses of water. Another way to measure is to drink 50 to 100 percent of your weight number in ounces. For example, if you weigh 150 lbs., drink 75 to 150 ounces of water every day.

3.     Manage your stress by not over-scheduling, sticking to a budget for gifts and entertainment, and avoiding negativity. (e.g., watching too much TV news, letting a negative relative influence you, negative self-talk)

4.     Catch up on your sleep by going to bed at the same time each night. After all, you will not have to study for any tests! Try to get at least seven to nine hours of sleep each night.

5.     Stay warm and dry, and dress in layers.

6.     Eat healthfully, and avoid too many sweets. It is possible to take only one cookie or to save room for your favorite dessert, and forego having a slice of each one. Also, when you are consuming a large meal, eat your veggies first.

7.     Exercise wisely. Even in the winter months, exercise is important to maintain a healthy body and brain, and it keeps your immune system strong. It might be safe to go for a walk each day, but then again, there could be ice or snow in your way. Use proper footwear or exercise indoors if possible.

8.     Do not smoke or vape. Smoking exacerbates respiratory illnesses, and it lowers resistance to illness and disease. Even though vaping does not contain the tar in a traditional cigarette, it is still a danger to your health. If you smoke or vape, it is pertinent to your long-term health to quit now. You will never regret that decision!

9.     Be wise when drinking alcohol. Drinking alcohol is generally not healthful. In fact, the only alcohol recognized as beneficial is one glass (five ounces) of red wine per day for women (two for men). If you do happen to drink beyond what is considered healthful, here are some guidelines to follow: One drink per hour is all your liver can metabolize. One drink is defined as five ounces of wine, 12 ounces of beer, or one ounce of liquor. In order to maintain fluid levels, drink eight ounces of water per hour also. (This will also help ward off a hangover the next day.) Don’t binge drink, which is defined by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) as imbibing five or more drinks for men, or four or more drinks for women, in a two-hour period.

10.     Take time for down time. Make certain this involves praying, listening to music you enjoy, thinking positive thoughts, a hobby you love, and/or spending time with someone you enjoy.

11.     Be a blessing to others. Remember, holiday time is not all about you. The more you give of yourself, the more blessed and healthy you will be. Go caroling, visit an old friend or a nursing home, smile at and hug your negative relatives, and go to church. Do something good for someone else. Spiritual health and physical health are not two separate entities; they complement each other!

The Wellness Center wishes you a very healthy and happy Holiday Season and New Year!


If you read this article to the end, and you would like to enter the Hilbert College Wellness Center monthly drawing, stop by the Wellness Center between 11:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, or send me an email with a brief description of what you learned, at wellnesscenter@hilbert.edu.


For more information on managing your health during the holidays, visit these Web sites:

CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)

Activebeat.com

Realsimple.com

9 Ways to Manage Late Semester Stress

Deadlines, Darkness, & Holidays – Oh My!
How to Manage Late Semester Stress
From the Hilbert College Wellness Center
by Kirsten Falcone, RN

It is that time of the year again. School projects are in full swing, finals are on the horizon, and you haven’t even started your holiday shopping! Many students are stressed, and most are losing sleep. Some have caught a “bug” and are now feeling behind. Stress is, according to Dictionary.com, “a specific response by the body to a stimulus, as fear or pain, that disturbs or interferes with the normal physiological equilibrium of an organism.” But, according to WebMD.com, it is more simply “what you feel when you have to handle more than you are used to [handling].” Does that sound familiar? If so, read on.

Certainly, some stress can be a good thing. Some studies show that a little stress may make you more resilient in the long run. The stress of a deadline approaching can also help you to hone all your attention onto that deadline. There is some evidence that short-term stress also provides the motivation to succeed. Once successful, one can reflect upon accomplishments, and this can actually be quite positive due to the reinforcement it provides! There is also some evidence that short-term stress can actually help ward off the common cold.

However, did you know stress also plays a role in most illness? That is because when we experience chronic stress, an overabundance of epinephrine (a.k.a. adrenaline) and cortisol (stress hormones) prevent many bodily systems, including the immune system, from functioning at full capacity. Even busy college students can take the time to benefit from some key lifestyle changes in order to stay healthy during a stressful time.

Here are 9 ways to lower the negative effects of stress:

  1. Get enough sleep.  Go to bed at the same time every night, and sleep at least seven to nine hours. For example, if you do well on eight hours of sleep per night, stick with that. Do not assume that seven will be enough. (For more information on sleep, read a recent Wellness Center article here.
  2. Make a list each day, and put the most important items at the top. Check them off as you go.
  3. Don’t procrastinate. Get your homework or important tasks done right away, so you won’t prolong the worry and the nagging in the back of your mind. Even just getting started on a long project will lessen the impact of the work that lies ahead.
  4. Don’t skip meals, and keep healthy snacks like fresh fruits and vegetables or low-sugar granola bars in your backpack. Conversely, avoid junk food, caffeine, and added sugar. Give your body the fuel it needs. (Here is the link to the Wellness Center article on what to eat at the campus cafeteria.)
  5. Drink enough water. This can range from eight 8-ounce glasses per day to an ounce for every two pounds you weigh. Drinking enough water will also help drive off the munchies, and it will increase your energy level almost immediately. (More about dehydration here)
  6. Stay away from alcohol and drugs, and stop smoking and/or vapingThese put even more stress on your body by lowering your immune response.
  7. Exercise. Take a brisk walk around campus twice, or work out in the campus recreation center. Do this at least three times per week. Look for any special programs that may be open to all students.
  8. Humor yourself. Find the humor in situations. Subscribe to a joke page on social media. Ask your friends if they know any jokes. There is scientific evidence that making yourself smile actually increases your happiness. It is true that laughter is often the best medicine.
  9. Talk to a good friend or counselor. Bottled-up emotions come out in other ways. Venting with a friend also helps your friend connect with you.

Some other ways to manage stress, in no particular order:


If you read this article to the end, and you would like to enter the Hilbert College Wellness Center monthly drawing, stop by the Wellness Center between 11:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, or send me an email with a brief description of what you learned, at wellnesscenter@hilbert.edu.

 

For more information on stress, check out these sources:

Mayo Clinic, Holiday Stress Management
CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
WebMD
Mayo Clinic, Stress Management In-Depth
Psychology Today, Why Some Stress Is Good
Health.com, Ways Stress Can Be Good For You

Holiday Concert with the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra | PHOTO GALLERY

Our 11th annual Holiday Concert with the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra featured a visit from Dr. Brophy, Hilbert’s incoming President. The BPO performed classic, fun Christmas tunes and also included a sing-along to a several holiday favorites. A piece from the popular holiday movie The Polar Express ended the night with everyone feeling festive and ready to begin the holiday season.

Tune into some of the selections played during the concert on our Spotify playlist here!

Hilbert Partners With Unyts To Host Donate Life Club Summits

On November 17, the Hilbert Center for Career and Community Engagement hosted a Donate Life Summit on the Hilbert campus. The event welcomed over 70 high school students from seven local high schools to learn about the importance of organ donation in our communities.

This event was held in partnership with Unyts, Western New York’s only organ, eye, tissue, and community blood center. Unyts established the Donate Life Club in 2004 to assist groups of students at area high schools in the planning, development, and implementation of a campaign to increase awareness about organ, tissue, and blood donation among their peers.

By participating in workshops during the event, the 70+ high school students who attended Hilbert’s Donate Life Club Summit in November were able to receive the knowledge necessary to help spread accurate information about the importance of organ, eye, tissue, and blood donation to their school and home communities. The ultimate goal of Unyts and the Donate Life Club is to establish donation as a cultural norm. 

Hilbert is proud to be hosting another Donate Life Club Summit on Tuesday, December 18th. For more information, please contact Rachel Wozniak at rwozniak@hilbert.edu or by phone at (716) 926-8929.

Hilbert’s Own Rachel Wozniak Awarded by Compass House

Rachel Wozniak (Assistant Director, Center for Career & Community Engagement) was recently awarded with the Martha Martin Youth Advocacy Award from Compass House, an emergency shelter for homeless youth in Erie County. The award was given in recognition of Wozniak’s work with Hilbert students via service learning and community engagement events to benefit Compass House and their clients.

Wozniak received the award during the Compass House’s “Big Hat & Tacky Tie Brunch,” an annual event hosted in support of Compass House’s programs.

Rachel Wozniak pictured with Lisa Freeman, Executive Director of Compass House

The Hilbert community is proud to support Compass House in their mission “To provide runaway, homeless and street youth with safe shelter and services, through a voluntary and mutually agreed-upon process, in an environment that supports dignity, respect and self-reliance.” Compass House is the area’s only shelter for both male and female youth, serving ages 12-17 with voluntary, confidential, and free services 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Rachel Wozniak was joined at the event with the support of her husband Dan Wozniak, mother-in-law Mrs. Wozniak, sisters Connie Wittmeyer and Denise Williams, Director of the Center for Career and Community Engagement Katie Martoche, and Hilbert alum Erika Betz (’17).

We are extremely proud of the entire Hilbert family for continuously working hard to benefit our community. Please join us in congratulating Rachel if you see her around campus!

You’re Invited to the Hawk Radio Legacy Event

Hawk Radio is throwing a party – and everyone’s invited! Join the Hawk Radio crew and special alumni guests for the Hawk Radio Legacy Party in the lower level of the Campus Center on Thursday, November 29th from 7:00-10:00 PM.

The party will feature a special LIVE broadcast with former on-air personalities, free food, a photo booth for all your Instagram-worthy moments, and games. Oh, and did we mention free food?

While you’re feeling the music at the party, you can also feel good about attending the event by donating much needed items to Compass House, a local organization near and dear to Hilbert’s heart. Hawk Radio will be collecting donations of personal items throughout the event to benefit this Western New York based not-for-profit, which provides young men and women shelter, counseling, and other services. While any donation is appreciated, a complete wish list of items can be found on the Compass House Website.

If you can’t make it to the celebration in person, you can prevent FOMO by listening in to the special live broadcast on Hawk Radio from any web browser (on any computer or mobile device) at http://hawkradio.hilbert.edu.

RSVP to the event and share the invite with friends here.