9 Tips to Eat Healthy In The Winter

Adapted from:
Tips on Eating Healthfully in the Winter
by Kirsten Falcone, RN 
Hilbert College Wellness Center

Click here to download the full article


Have you found a little extra padding around your middle lately? You are not alone!

Many people find that wintertime eating is tricky when it comes to maintaining weight. The holidays and their fattening menus have passed, New Year’s resolutions are almost forgotten, and we are back to our old habits.

Here are 9 tips that can help you reach the warmer days with your waistline intact and a healthy spring in your step:

  1. Drink more water. The dry winter air tends to dehydrate us, and what we mistake for hunger is often just thirst. Drinking a glass of water before you eat will hydrate you, help curb your appetite, and aid digestion.
  2. Eat fruits and vegetables. A good rule of thumb is to make sure half your plate is fruits and vegetables. Try to pass up anything with fat or sugar added, such as fruit compote or au gratin potatoes. Eat your vegetables and fruit before you eat your main course, so that you acquire the nutrients you need and do not overdo it with the more high calorie entree. (No, French fries and potato chips do not count as vegetables!)
  3. Opt for lean meats. If given a choice between a hot dog, cheeseburger, or a chicken breast, choose the chicken breast more often.
  4. Focus on whole grains.  The fiber in a true whole grain product is better for your heart and digestion, and whole grain products contain more nutrients. Try to choose whole wheat or whole grain products instead of white bread.
  5. Avoid processed food. Try to avoid quick fix solutions, like cereal bars, protein bars, and other foods in prepackaged containers. Whole foods are better and have fewer additives.
  6. Eat just half. It’s okay to eat only half of the food on your plate, or simply use a smaller plate to control your portions. Do not let your conscience guilt you into retaining your membership in the Clean Plate Club.
  7. Sample the fattening choices. Yes, it is okay to “treat yourself” to more fattening items. Just limit it to a spoonful or two!
  8. Stay away from junk food. Keep away from the bags of chips, cookies, popcorn, and other temptations. This is a good time to “just say no.” If you need something to munch on, go for the carrots, almonds, apples, bananas, and other easily tote-able foods.
  9. Skip dessert more often. Save dessert for one day per week. You can curb your cravings and satisfy a sweet tooth by substituting fresh fruit for dessert after a meal.

Do you have helpful, healthful tips to share? Comment below!


If you read this article to the end, and you would like to enter the Hilbert College Wellness Center monthly drawing, stop by the Wellness Center between 11:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, or send me an email with a brief description of what you learned, at wellnesscenter@hilbert.edu.

Lasertron Lock-In | PHOTO GALLERY

Students were taken to Lasertron in Amherst for a midnight – 7 am lock-in experience. Including unlimited games of lasertag and cybersport which is a game where you ride on a motorized car that combines hockey, basketball, and lacrosse. Food was served and this year we have added arcade credit. 
Part of the Hawks Take Flight program. Each event is geared towards residential students to see areas around Buffalo that they might not have the chance to experience. Almost all of our events hold up to 50 participants and include snacks, transportation, and FUN!

The Hawks have landed!

Graduate Research Projects | PHOTO GALLERY

Unique to the Hilbert graduate curriculum is an integrated research project threaded throughout the program. Unlike most graduate programs that ask for a final semester thesis, the Hilbert program allows for a more thorough application of theory and research since the project starts early in the program. The research acts as a foundation upon which to ground and challenge theory to a practical application, culminating in a final capstone major project.

Unity with Our Community – Rescheduled

On Friday, March 15th, Hilbert College students, faculty, and staff are invited to participate in our rescheduled Unity with Our Community event, a service day devoted to carrying on the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in our community. This day is an opportunity for us at Hilbert to connect with the work Dr. King advocated for and to understand the importance of taking action to promote equality, justice, respect, and compassion.

Current community partners for the day include:

716 MinistriesA community development organization that stabilizes neighborhoods by restoring neglected housing stock. The organization sells these rehabilitated homes at a low cost, to community members and first-time homebuyers, largely thanks to the faithful volunteers that serve with the agency.

Compass HouseProvides runaway, homeless, and street youth with safe shelter and services. Compass House stands as one of the nation’s oldest shelter and service providers for youth of all gender identities, offering shelter, counseling, and so much more.

Food Bank of WNYThe primary hunger-relief organization in Western New York. The agency obtains nutritious food and distributes support to our community members throughout Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Erie, and Niagara Counties.

Little Portion Friary: A volunteer-run organization that brings forth the mission of the Catholic Church to provide food for the hungry, clothing for the undressed, and shelter for the homeless.

Salvation Army in Buffalo: Provides a variety of programs and services that annually benefit over 30,000 economically disadvantaged people. The Salvation Army is an integral part of the local human service network, providing housing, clothing, nutritional, social, and spiritual assistance through a wide range of separate but interrelated programs and services.

S.S. Columba Brigid: A neighborhood, multicultural Catholic church where all are welcome.

Veterans One-Stop Center of WNY, Inc.: a nonprofit corporation offering U.S. Veterans and their families the convenience of a one-stop, barrier-free location in which to access a holistic range of social and health services in the comfort of a “home base” environment that is always welcoming, affirming and responsive to their needs.

PLEASE NOTE:
If you registered for the original date for Unity with Our Community, you will need to re-register online prior to the event. Please complete the registration form online at hilbert.edu/UWOC.

How to Beat The Winter Blahs

Adapted from:
Lacking Get-up-and-go? 
How to beat the winter blahs
by Kirsten Falcone, RN 
Hilbert College Wellness Center

Click here to download the full article


Winter is officially here with her cold, snow, freezing rain, and short daylight hours. If you are like many, winter weather can make you feel like going into your “cave” and hibernating until spring. But you’re not a bear, and reality continues even in less-than-stellar weather. When the blahs of winter seem to overcome you, here are some ways to beat them:

1. Follow a healthy lifestyle.

There are several factors that contribute to an overall healthy lifestyle.

Eat well.
Eat a balance of lean proteins, fruits and vegetables, bread and cereals, and milk and dairy products; and stay away from junk food and sugary snacks as much as possible. Drinking enough water (64 to 125 ounces per day) is also important for all your bodily systems to function.

Be active.
Exercise improves health and mood. In the winter, you can get enough exercise by going to the gym, running up and down your residence hall stairs for 20 minutes, or putting on your coat and boots and going outside for a walk.

Get plenty of rest.
The proper amount of sleep varies from individual to individual, but the general recommendation is 7 to 9 hours per night. Be consistent with the number of hours you get, and wind down each night to keep a bedtime around 10:00 or 11:00 p.m.

2. Check that your symptoms aren’t something more serious.

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) runs rampant this time of year, but there is help. For more information, see the Wellness Center article on SAD here.

3. Switch things up.

Gain new perspectives by getting out and about! Drive to the Botanical Gardens in Lackawanna, study in a different location like a local coffee shop, or visit Chestnut Ridge Park for a hike in the woods.

Pamper yourself, especially if you have achieved a personal goal, such as doing well on a test or resisting the temptation to skip your daily exercise.

Take a break from social media to go for a walk, visit a friend, or read a novel. Finding ways to use your critical thinking skills also helps to beat any winter woes.

4. Think about the future.

While Western New York winters can sometimes feel endless, Spring will be here before you know it. There is light at the end of the tunnel. Give yourself positive self-talk, and tell yourself you will make it!


If you read this article to the end, and you would like to enter the Hilbert College Wellness Center monthly drawing, stop by the Wellness Center between 11:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, or send me an email with a brief description of what you learned, at wellnesscenter@hilbert.edu.


For more ideas on beating the winter blahs, visit these Web Sites:

WebMD depression quiz

The Huffington Post

World of Psychology

4 Methods To Break Your Cell Phone Addiction

Put Down the Phone!
Health Consequences of Using Cell Phones
From the Hilbert College Wellness Center
by Kirsten Falcone, RN

The topic of cell phones and courtesy frequently comes up in conversation these days. Generally, the sentiment is that cell phone users do not follow polite protocol regarding the use of their phones. In fact, many users are becoming less aware of just how obtrusive, interrupting, and just plain rude the use of cell phones is these days.

All social etiquette aside, if you know anyone like this (or if this is you), it might help to break the habit by learning the health consequences of too much cell phone use.

According to several reliable sources, these are just a few of the possible health consequences cell phone abuse can cause:

1.     Injury or death in a car accident (25 percent of car accidents in the U.S. are caused by cell phone distraction)

2.     Addiction involving dopamine and serotonin, with physical withdrawal symptoms

3.     Anxiety and depression

4.     Brain alteration

5.     Eye diseases (including retinal damage leading to macular degeneration)

6.     Nerve damage to eyes (occipital neuralgia)

7.     Finger, neck, back and other musculoskeletal problems

8.     Carpal tunnel syndrome

9.     Physical inactivity, leading to obesity-related diseases

10.     Slow reaction time, caused by distraction

11.     Increased likelihood of falls/accidents, also caused by distraction

12.     Stress

13.     Disturbed sleep

14.     Bacterial infection/reinfection from the unsanitized surface of the phone

15.     Decreased attention span

16.     Social isolation

17.     Hearing damage (if listening to headphones above 85 decibels)

18.     Possibility of carcinogenic radiation

YIKES!

So What are some solutions? The logical solution is to decrease the amount of time spent on your phone, and this can be accomplished by putting restrictions and boundaries around your own phone use. One way to do that is to change your mindset.

Here are four methods to break your cell phone addiction:

  1. Think privacy. Whenever possible, do not text or talk on the phone if someone else is there to see or hear you. Most phone conversations can wait until you are safely out of sight of other humans.
  2. Think courtesy. Is there someone physically in front of you waiting for your attention, and you are using your phone? This is not considered polite. Always give physical people priority. While we’re on the topic of courtesy, make it a habit to turn off your phone in worship services, at work, in theaters, and while eating with family, friends and/or colleagues.
  3. Think safety. Are you walking, driving, or operating machinery? Put your phone away until you can safely pick it up again! A great suggestion is to keep your phone in the back seat of your car, out of arm’s reach, so you will not be tempted to use it while driving.
  4. Think necessity. Do you really need your phone at all times? Couldn’t you leave it in your room or the back seat of your car? Do you need to keep social media or games on it? Or, could you delete those apps in favor of instead using your computer later, after homework is done? (Just kidding! Homework is never done.) If you do not live in a residence hall, is it necessary to keep the phone next to your bed while you sleep? Probably not. That is why alarm clocks were invented!

So, the next time you are in a group of people, just put down the phone, encourage them to do the same, and engage with them. You just might gain a bit of old-fashioned connectedness, which we all need for our good health!


If you read this article to the end, and you would like to enter the Hilbert College Wellness Center monthly drawing, stop by the Wellness Center between 11:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, or send me an email with a brief description of what you learned, at wellnesscenter@hilbert.edu.


For more information on cell phone usage and physical health, and cell phone usage tips, visit the following sites:

Health.com

Journal of Psychology & Psychotherapy

Natural Living Ideas

Reader’s Digest